Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Moving?

I am moving out of my current spot and getting a desk elsewhere in the building, according to Nurse Sally.  She seems nice.

I have endured three years in my current spot.  Three seems to be my limit for anything.

What she is calling a desk is one table in a large hallway.  Other people occupy other tables.  "My desk" is currently a repository of papers, binders, and boxes.

Part of the problem is that this table is adjacent to the nursing staffing people.  It will be too easy for them to be scrambling for coverage and find their solution in Nurse Enid, "who is just sitting there, doing nothing."  Unlike the other office nurses, I'm classified as a floor nurse.

Another issue is that I keep all of my current duties, plus extra as added by Nurse Sally.  Not sure when I get to sit at my new table/desk, which is nowhere near where I need to be to schedule appointments, procedures, and to do rounds with doctors.

The other issue is that someone, such as Nurse Fortune, could find out, flip out, claiming I'm getting a cushy deal, and file a complaint with our union.  Even though Nurse Sally seems nice, she is powerless against Nurse Fortune and the union.

I did some paperwork from the charts as requested.  When I handed it to Nurse Sally, she said to give it to her secretary.  Her secretary occupies one of the tables near my new table.

The secretary glared at me when I handed her the papers.  (I had the foresight and experience to make copies first.)  "Listen," she started, "Don't go thinking that you are going to make more work for me."

"Sally told to research these issues and fill out these forms and give them to you," I explained.  "That was my assignment."

"Well," she huffed, "You could have said 'no'."

"Actually, I'm not in a position to refuse an assignment," I tried.

"So because you do whatever anyone tells you, now I have more work?" she sneered.  "Does that seem right to you?"

This is a hopeless cycle everywhere in this hospital.

"Take your own advice and refuse to do it," I told the secretary.

"I didn't ask you to tell me what to do, thank you very much," she snapped.  "Let's get that straight right now.  You don't tell me what to do.  You don't give me work.  You are not my supervisor.  Don't even speak to me.  Got it?"

I left and returned to my previous (or current?) work area.  There, I realized that no provisions were made for my addition to that department.  The "desk" I used varied from day to day and was a table or counter where I could spread out papers to work on them.  My supervisor and the other employees had cabinets dedicated to their personal stuff, while she told me that I could not keep anything in the office, including pens I needed to write with.

If people ask, I'll tell them that there was not enough work in my current department to justify two nurses, so I was reassigned.

I will not allow myself to get excited about this move because it may not happen.



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